Every Person Has A Story

every_one_has_a_storyLook what Lucy’s 2nd grade class, the Mitchell Elementary School librarians and I created in just one week! When the librarians learned that I am an artist who creates world maps, they asked me if I would be interested in working with the second graders who were doing a unit on recycling, to create a map out of outdated text books. I jumped at the opportunity and suggested we attempt to get it done before Multicultural Night in mid-April (our initial meeting was in mid-March and we had to schedule around spring break). Amazingly, we did it!

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Up-cycled Text Book World Map: The Making Of

Over the course of a week, I visited with Lucy’s class for an hour on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. By Friday I had the finished piece sent off to be framed!

On Monday, the kids, teachers and I tore all our favorite images and words out of about 20 books. These were text books for young elementary readers filled with rich material and beautiful imagery with titles like Don’t Forget to FlySing It to the Sea, and Window to the Sky – not at all what you imagine when you think back to the text books we had in high school.

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Back at home, I went through all the torn images – there was a plethora of subject matter: animals, plants, planets, dinosaurs, landscapes, people. When I make my maps I like to focus on messages of diversity, inclusivity, and unity among humans – acknowledging our differences and celebrating them! Remember that’s why I never include political boundaries. For that reason, I decided it made sense for our final work of art to focus on images of people. The 4-foot piece would hang in the library, be titled Every Person Has a Story, and would be dedicated to the kids’ amazing teacher, Mrs. Kirlin, who is retiring this year.

On Wednesday we spent an hour gluing in the library – some kids worked on words, the others on images. Back at home, I used my big map template to cut out the continents and glued them onto the background. I Modge Podged the whole thing and on Friday we just hung the finished piece up in the library and talked about what we learned.

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What the Kids Learned

• Recycling helps save our planet and up-cycling is a great way to make art!

• You can accomplish SO much when you work as a team. Mrs. Kirlin helped them do the math and we figured out that what they accomplished in 2 hours would have taken me, an artist on her own, 48 hours (or more)!

• There are lots of different people who live on this planet – we may look different, eat different foods, make different music and tell different stories, but we all have the same desires: to feel safe, to be loved and accepted, to learn and to grow.

• When they see the final piece framed and hanging in the library I hope they get a sense of accomplishment and pride from getting to share their hard work with the world. Perhaps there’s a budding artist or two among them who has been left with the inspiration to grow up and make this world a more beautiful place.

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What I Learned

• A paradox: working with children is exhausting and invigorating at the same time.

• There is satisfaction in getting my message of world peace and acceptance across to a group of school children whose minds are open to learning and willing to listen. However much I hope that my art can help towards making positive change in this world, I know that there are grown-ups out there who will never get it.

• I am so grateful that I had the opportunity to give back, in my own special way, to this amazing school that is working so hard to build a strong educational foundation for both my daughters!

• I have said it before and I will say it again, but Sophie and Lucy really do have a love/hate relationship with my art. Sometimes I think they see it as a third child that they have to compete with for my attention. But they also understand the joy of making and being creative and I can tell that there are moments when they feel proud of what I do. It was so AMAZING to include Lucy and her classmates in the process of making this piece. Although, I did put my signature on it (just to make if feel like a piece of Fine Art), the piece isn’t mine at all… it’s theirs.

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When you’re not prepared to give a speech and you cry while doing it.

I wasn’t crying because I was scared or nervous. I was crying because I was truly moved. Did I really deserve all this attention? All this validation? Less than 2 months ago I made the decision that it was time to share my art with the world beginning by submitting four pieces to the Brookfield Arts Tenant Show in the Republic Plaza building in downtown Denver. Imagine my shock when I saw all four maps hanging front and center as you enter the building from 16th Street Mall (see photos to understand why I was so excited). Just that was enough recognition to last me a lifetime – hundreds if not thousands of people walk through that lobby every day! Winning ‘Best of Show’ was just gravy.

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At the opening reception 15 of my friends and family came to see my art, to see all the other wonderful submissions and ultimately to support me. We rolled in from an earlier after-work-happy-hour just in time for the start of the awards ceremony. We stood through numerous categories and ribbon presentations, honestly, ready for it to be over soon after it started. I admit that I leaned over and told a friend “this is going to be really embarrassing if I don’t win anything” — it wasn’t the most thrilling awards ceremony and I felt guilty that all my friends were having to sit through it, especially since all the free wine and food had run out. Until, of course, I won! And had to give a speech – eek!

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Andra Archer, the curator, had these kind words to say before handing me the microphone, “Creating a series of art that features the same subject while still having each piece stand alone in its uniqueness is the work of a true artist.” She said so much more but it’s all a blur. That statement stood out to me because she had just put to rest my biggest insecurity about my art. “I just make world maps,” my inner critic would say, “what’s so creative about that?” I LOVE making world maps. All I want to do is make world maps. So F-U, inner critic! Andra says that’s the work of a true artist! Seriously, though it was that statement that made me cry. Unfortunately, an artist putting her work out there for the first time, needs that encouragement and validation. At least just a little to keep on going.

“We all want to know what gave you the idea to make these maps?” Andra asked.

[Note: You are about to read the speech I did NOT give. Because I wasn’t prepared to give a speech so instead I cried and rambled on. If I had been prepared, maybe it would have sounded a little bit like this]:

I came up with the idea 12 years ago after I moved to Denver from Australia, soon after having met my husband on a plane. I was a traveler in my 20s and a student. I spent a decade traveling around the world, being ‘irresponsible’ in the eyes of the people back home. When I arrived in Denver, I moved in with Scott, I got my first 9-5 job as a web designer and became very ‘responsible’. I also experienced boredom for the first time – both at work and after work. In the past, as a student I always had a project I was procrastinating on; as a traveler my days were filled with exploring new cities, meeting people, speaking foreign languages, tasting new foods. It felt like I had never before experienced a moment of boredom.

In this new life, I didn’t know what to do with myself when I got home from work every evening. My only options seemed to be going to a restaurant where I would inevitably eat and drink too much or else just sit and watch tv. I could exercise but I was too tired at the end of the day. I was coming to terms with the fact that it was going to be a while before I would travel again. Scott had just returned from a trip around the world when I met him and we were doing a lot of serious talk about marriage and children. It was time to settle down. But what about this boredom I was faced with; what about feeling that I had to stay true to myself, the vagabond who was now homebound? I was worried and Scott probably was too. I had an ex-boyfriend in Italy that told me, while breaking up, that “even if you were chained to the ground, still you would find a way to fly.” It sounds more poetic in Italian. He knew me so well. Maybe I just couldn’t take this new stable life and I’d wake up one day, pack my bags, and walk out the door saying “Sayonara, Scott.” Or “Adios, au revoir, ciao! I’m off to see the world, again.”

That’s when the idea of making art came to me. World maps to be specific. Studying art in college had turned me off from it, but that was because I was making art for other people – as assignments to impress and appease my feminist/gotta-be-controversial art school professors. Then, I was making art for all the wrong reasons. Now, I was truly inspired. I felt this need to create, not just to fill time, but because it was a way for me to fly while simultaneously choosing to settle and stay grounded (or in my ex-boyfriend’s words “chained to the ground”).

I suddenly saw this time at the end of the day as a gift. I could use it to make art. Making world maps would keep me connected to the rest of the world in some weird way, remind me of past travels and allow me to dream of places yet to visit. It would give me strict parameters which as an artist I needed. The empty canvas was way too intimidating. The fear of endless possibilities was paralyzing to me. But, I knew I was making world maps and that had meaning to me. Where my creativity could let loose was with what I chose to fill those world maps – old favorites like collages and doodles, new materials I had never worked with like burlap and rose petals. Travel taught me to have courage, to be continuously curious, to explore and to be open minded. Creating art allowed me to continue down that path and it let me do it in one place – actually, it required that I do it in one place because these maps are huge! Suddenly, settling down didn’t feel so scary.

So, put simply I started making these maps twelves years ago to satisfy the adventurer in me and to feel 100% confident saying yes when Scott asked me to marry him (on a plane, by the way). This is my first time exhibiting my art in 12 years! I’ve given some maps away to friends, done a few commissioned pieces but mostly they’ve just sat flat, piled atop one another, under my bed. The fact is that putting your art out there, putting yourself out there, is super scary. Honestly, I’m not sure what takes more courage committing to one person for the rest of your life or showing your art! That’s why I’m standing here in tears. Not because I’m scared, but because I am moved by Andra’s kind words reassuring me as an artist; I am overwhelmed by the love I feel from all the people who are here to support me tonight, including my husband; and I am truly honored to be presented with this award. Thank you.

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A Map for My Niece

One of my first posts to this blog was last spring when I was being creative in New Mexico. I was making one of my quilt maps on wood for my niece Lyla. I recently took Sophie and Lucy to visit my sister, Emilie, and her family in Colorado Springs and got to take photos of the map hanging in Lyla’s big girl room. Emilie did a beautiful job decorating Lyla’s room and I love how the framed Wander + Wonder World Map fits right in with the rest of the decor. Enjoy these photos!

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For the Love of Bikes and Horses

The June wedding came and went and my commissioned piece was far from finished. Oh, the guilt! As a reminder the map I was creating was supposed to be a wedding gift for a couple that loves bikes and horses – check out my original post. Fortunately my client (patron? that’s more appropriate for someone purchasing art, right?)… yeah, patron. Fortunately my patron was understanding. I love making art but sadly it is low on my priority list behind my kids, my husband, my full time job and, alas, exercising. I’m proud that I make time for it at all!

Also, there were materials and processes I’d never worked with in this map and at times that had me at a standstill. Fear is the biggest procrastinator. I knew I wanted to work with bike chain and I knew I needed to glue metal to wood. Both were new to me and scary. I had spent so much time already drawing the gears with graphite and I loved the map as it was, so I was scared to screw it up. But I also knew I wanted to incorporate that rusty bike chain. And I needed to include some sort of reference to horses.

This is where the map was when I got stuck. It probably sat in my art studio like this for at least a month!

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Then… I finally got to work. I bought three different kinds of glue and did tests to see what would work best. I also realized I would have to separate the chain in smaller pieces and then nail them in at smaller intervals. Just deciding what nails to use took time and research. I settled on small black carpet tacks and the best glue was E6000 because it dried clear. Best part of this process… getting my hands dirty.

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The finishing touches were adding a little horseshoe over Colorado where the wedding took place and the couple call home. A little symbol of good luck for a happy marriage. And lastly, I used my wood burner to burn in their wedding date in the bottom right hand corner – 6.11.16. I hope this map brings happiness to the new couple and inspires them to wander and wonder.

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Sky Lanterns

Last week my family went to Lantern Fest, here in Colorado. What an amazing spectacle.  I’ve never seen anything like it in my life. Amazingly, I was able to take a moment to take it all in, amidst taking photos, video and helping my kids and husband actually light our lanterns (which was no easy feat!). I’m always torn between being in the moment (being true to the Buddhist in me) and capturing the moment (being true to the photographer in me). I usually manage to do a little of both.

I do remember being in the moment when I said to Sophie, “Isn’t it beautiful? Isn’t it amazing?”

And she responded by saying, “Yeah Mommy, can you make me one of your maps that looks like this?”

Absolutely.

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And… here is the result. I love it.

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You can view the entire album of the lantern festival on my Flickr account.

Bikes and Horses – A commissioned piece.

This is my second time ever being commissioned to create a piece of art. Very exciting. I’ve hesitated calling myself an artist because it seems like you have to sell your art to be considered an artist… but now, I give myself permission. I am officially an artist. Woohoo.

The recipients of this commissioned piece will be a couple who are getting married this summer. The groom’s sister, Michelle, an old coworker of mine, reached out asking me to make a world map as a wedding gift. He’s an engineer who loves mountain biking; she’s a veterinarian who loves horses. They both love traveling. Combining bikes and horses at first felt like a challenge but as I got to thinking and sketching, a ton of ideas came to me.

I sent these sketches to Michelle and explained to her my ideas.

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I’m going to hold off telling you what idea we’re leaning towards (you’ll have to check back as I get started and post my progress), but I will share that I got a bunch of old rusty bike parts and found some mini horseshoes online and am ready to get started. Also, Michelle sent me a photo of some art that her brother previously had commissioned – love the colors, graphic elements and distressed textures. Great inspiration.

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“Maybe someday you’ll go there.”

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As mentioned in my last post, I came to Taos, New Mexico with the hopes of making art and being creative. My sister, Emilie is 7 months pregnant and has a 19 month old toddler, Lyla. Back home she’s working on Lyla’s new big girl room so that she can get her nursery ready for their new baby boy arriving in June. I asked her if she would like a world map for Lyla’s new room and knowing the feminine and delicate theme of the room, I suggested one of my quilt maps on wood. I make these maps with little squares of scrapbook paper that match the color of the room. The paper fills the continents and then I glue them on to light wood which gives a nice rustic look and the grain of the wood is like ripples in the oceans. I paint the whole thing with Modge Podge and then having it framed, exposed without glass, is the finishing touch.

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Emilie took it upon herself to go buy the perfect paper and patterns that she loved and brought them on our trip. I brought the sheet of paper with the world map traced on it. The dining table at our rental place, made from a reclaimed barn door, was the perfect place to get working. It was reminiscent of my work area at home. Sunlight shines in from the floor to ceiling windows behind me and I can see expansive views of the surrounding mountains. I love that I can feel inspired in a place so far from home. When I get back home I’ll work with the wood and deliver the art to Emilie so she can pick the perfect frame to go with the room’s decor.

I’m so happy I get to make art for my niece. She’s too young to appreciate it now but as she grows up, I imagine her mom and dad pointing to places on the map and saying “maybe someday you’ll go there.” See, part of my secret plan with these maps is to subliminally foster future world travelers. Shhh, don’t tell anyone.