The Story : World Map of Tiny Treasures

Remember being a kid and finding a baby blue broken eggshell beneath a tree in your backyard. Remember the story it told of a life growing inside it. The image of a tiny bird pecking its way out, then nestled and squished beside its siblings, mouth agape waiting for a worm from mama bird. Days or weeks later that same baby bird flittering atop a branch, listening to chirps and squawks from both mom and dad encouraging it to fledge. Fly. Be free. Baby bird apprehensive and scared but then doing it, going for it! I was going to call it courage, but really it’s just trust. Trusting that nature knows what is and isn’t possible. Trust in what you are meant to do. Trust in your calling.

You would pick up the eggshell with the utmost care, bring it inside and put it safely on a shelf in your room, where it would be kept company by your collection of rocks, sticks and other tiny treasures.

What’s the story behind a smooth piece of sea glass found washed up on shore or a tiny snail-like fossil? An arrowhead, a geode, a feather, a snake’s skin, a wasp’s nest? Each one filled with beauty and a sense of wonder. 

My kids say I’m no fun. I don’t know how to play. They’re right. As a grown up I don’t love pretending I’m a dragon, I don’t enjoy tickle-fests (all that squealing, ugh) and I leave the fort-building to the kids. But I will argue, that being an artist has allowed me to stay in touch with my inner-child by focusing on the beauty that surrounds me, by being in the present moment, by finding amazement in nature’s treasures.

This project in particular allowed me to connect with my kids because we did it together. We went treasure-hunting. We collected. We filled the ‘Nature Box’ that hung in our kitchen for two, three years. I knew all along I would make a map out of all our findings. I wasn’t sure how but I knew they would all end up immortalized in a work of art.

You know what the craziest thing is? There are pieces in this map that I collected when I was my daughters’ ages – tiny ceramic mice, itty bitty sea shells saved in a vile that I found with my cousin on the beach in France when the tide was low… when I was five years old. There are beads from when I worked with my best friends in a jewelry store as a teenager; sea glass I found with those same friends, growing up on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. And pieces I collected in my 20s when I traveled the world – seashells from Fiji and a little brass Ganesha from India. The fact is, there are hundreds of tiny treasures in this piece and they each have a story.

I thought this work of art was a tribute to wandering, wondering and the joy of collecting. I thought it was an excuse to do something fun with my daughters, even if it isn’t their definition of ‘fun’. I didn’t know it would turn out to be a portrait of my life. Isn’t that the beauty of art – finding the unexpected, telling stories you didn’t know you intended to tell – the big treasure among the tiny ones. 

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100Days100Maps : Looking Back

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Why Make 100 World Maps in 100 Days?

• Fear of procrastination/laziness – knowing I need accountability to get things done. (Ala Gretchen Rubin’s 4 tendencies – I am an obliger) and I knew social media could help me with this.

• Fear that freelance opportunities and Athena Project volunteer work would take precedence over making my maps – that’s not why I quit my job. I quit my job to be an artist and I was afraid it would end up on the bottom of my priority list.

• For years my mind was overflowing with map ideas but I just didn’t have the time, suddenly I did and I wanted to hurry up and get those ideas out… to make room for others, maybe better ones.

• I wanted to LET GO. My maps in the past took so much time and were detailed and precise. That was great but I wanted this adventure to allow me to let loose, let go, get messy, experiment.

What I Learned

• It felt really good to produce so much even if I didn’t love every one

• I learned that people have different tastes – some of the maps that I liked least were the ones that others liked most. I always enjoyed the process of making my maps so it’s good to accept that the final product doesn’t really matter – someone might love it. Just do the work and enjoy the process. There is a higher power at work here. It isn’t just about me and my preferences. The artist as a vessel (I’ll have to explore this in a future blog). Once the art is made, it isn’t mine anymore. I make art for others.

• I learned that my favorite maps to make are those that use organic materials. Their shapes generally lend themselves to the shapes of the continents (like flowers, leaves, sticks, rocks and food items). And it made me feel earthy, connected. That’s hard to describe but I loved the feeling. I was channeling my inner Andy Goldsworthy (if you don’t know of him, look him up – what he creates with nature is incredible).

• I was also surprised at how much I enjoyed sitting at the computer and doing digital maps. I never did them before because I spent so many hours in front of the computer when I was working as a web/graphic designer and when I got home I just wanted to use my hands. Now, I was happy to have an excuse to sit and use the software I know so well, with which I feel I can make magic happen.

• I still feel like I have to explore paint. I did some nice watercolors but I have much more to do when it comes to paint. I thought I would paint more but I have a block, a fear… I’m scared it’s going to be bad. I hope now that I will purchase a few canvases and I will paint and no one says I have to show it to anyone. Just keep working it until I feel happy with it. Maybe add in bits of pieces of collage – call it mixed media instead of just paint. That seems more up my alley.

• I did feel good when I made a map that had more of an activist message. Like finding the message that I purposefully don’t add political boundaries in my maps because it’s important to me that I get across that we are humans sharing this planet with cultural differences but a common tie as humans (gotta work on that messaging). Also the rice map about world hunger or the handprint map about peace. There’s an activist in me and since I don’t feel comfortable talking politics, I really could use my art to make statements. I should explore that more. I think I’m stopping myself because of my rebelling against the intellectualism I experienced in college which just annoyed me. But the truth is, last years elections were what motivated me to get my art out there. I felt the world needed my art, not just for the beauty but there are deeper messages there and it’s not just about the fact that travel is fun. It’s about what we learn through travel – to be open-minded, accepting of other cultures, to connect and to be present.

• I will never be at a loss of ideas. I still feel like I have so many more and not enough time. That is a good thing.

• I am eager to spend more time on one map now that I am not doing them daily. I’m excited to focus on quality rather than quantity. Next I want to work on 10-15 maps that I would be happy to hang in my house and that in a year or two I hang as a solo art show.

Bikes and Horses – A commissioned piece.

This is my second time ever being commissioned to create a piece of art. Very exciting. I’ve hesitated calling myself an artist because it seems like you have to sell your art to be considered an artist… but now, I give myself permission. I am officially an artist. Woohoo.

The recipients of this commissioned piece will be a couple who are getting married this summer. The groom’s sister, Michelle, an old coworker of mine, reached out asking me to make a world map as a wedding gift. He’s an engineer who loves mountain biking; she’s a veterinarian who loves horses. They both love traveling. Combining bikes and horses at first felt like a challenge but as I got to thinking and sketching, a ton of ideas came to me.

I sent these sketches to Michelle and explained to her my ideas.

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I’m going to hold off telling you what idea we’re leaning towards (you’ll have to check back as I get started and post my progress), but I will share that I got a bunch of old rusty bike parts and found some mini horseshoes online and am ready to get started. Also, Michelle sent me a photo of some art that her brother previously had commissioned – love the colors, graphic elements and distressed textures. Great inspiration.

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“Maybe someday you’ll go there.”

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As mentioned in my last post, I came to Taos, New Mexico with the hopes of making art and being creative. My sister, Emilie is 7 months pregnant and has a 19 month old toddler, Lyla. Back home she’s working on Lyla’s new big girl room so that she can get her nursery ready for their new baby boy arriving in June. I asked her if she would like a world map for Lyla’s new room and knowing the feminine and delicate theme of the room, I suggested one of my quilt maps on wood. I make these maps with little squares of scrapbook paper that match the color of the room. The paper fills the continents and then I glue them on to light wood which gives a nice rustic look and the grain of the wood is like ripples in the oceans. I paint the whole thing with Modge Podge and then having it framed, exposed without glass, is the finishing touch.

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Emilie took it upon herself to go buy the perfect paper and patterns that she loved and brought them on our trip. I brought the sheet of paper with the world map traced on it. The dining table at our rental place, made from a reclaimed barn door, was the perfect place to get working. It was reminiscent of my work area at home. Sunlight shines in from the floor to ceiling windows behind me and I can see expansive views of the surrounding mountains. I love that I can feel inspired in a place so far from home. When I get back home I’ll work with the wood and deliver the art to Emilie so she can pick the perfect frame to go with the room’s decor.

I’m so happy I get to make art for my niece. She’s too young to appreciate it now but as she grows up, I imagine her mom and dad pointing to places on the map and saying “maybe someday you’ll go there.” See, part of my secret plan with these maps is to subliminally foster future world travelers. Shhh, don’t tell anyone.